The new GALAXIE® from Wittenstein….another new cutting edge product available from Micromech

A brand new motor/gearbox type from Wittenstein. Its unique design enables virtually full surface contact during power transmission.
This means that the compact Galaxie® Drive Systems and gearboxes with hollow shaft provide previously unachievable performance data including:
Wittenstein Galaxie
  • Extremely high torque density
  • High torsional rigidity
  • Smooth running
  • Improved positional accuracy
  • Completely backlash-free operation.

The superiority of the gearbox type is based on three radically new ideas;

  • Dynamic single teeth instead of a gear wheel
  • Surface instead of linear contact
  • Logarithmic spiral tooth geometry

The Wittenstein Galaxie® is perfect for high performance engineering applications.

An ingenious concept in 4 variants and 5 sizes
Galaxie® D
Hollow-shaft compact drive, axially integrated permanently excited synchronous motor with standard sensor systems
Galaxie® DF
Ultra-flat hollow-shaft compact drive, radially integrated permanently excited synchronous motor with standard sensor systems
Galaxie® G
Backlash-free gearbox with optional coaxial planetary input stage and adapter plate for mounting on standard industrial servo motors
Galaxie® GH
Galaxie® Gearbox with hypoid input stage and adapter plate for mounting on standard industrial servo motors.
For more information on the Galaxie® or any other Wittenstein Products contact Micromech on 01376 333333 or Email sales@micromech.co.uk
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State-of-the-art stepper driver with wettable flanks

Trinamic’s monolithic stepper motor driver TMC2202 with integrated MOSFETs allows for optical inspection with its wettable flanks QFN package.

Micromech is pleased to announce the arrival of the new high-performance stepper motor driver IC with improved optical inspection capabilities from Trinamic.

Trinamic - TMC2202“Automatic optical inspection (AOI) after assembly is increasingly important. While proper soldering at QFP type packages can easily be detected with a camera from above, QFN packages typically require X-Ray analysis.”, explains Michael Randt, founder and CEO of Trinamic. By merging the small board space consumption of a leadless package with easily inspectable sides, the TMC2202 is our first component that comes in a wettable flanks package – where the shape of the leads generates a visible solder.”

The TMC2202-WA stepper driver IC can drive motors with up to 1.2A RMS. Like all of Trinamic’s stepper motor drivers, the component offers a step resolution of up to 256 microsteps per full step to achieve perfect sinusoidal control – even in systems with a limited achievable step pulse rate. Further development of Trinamic’s StealthChop technology, which was introduced two years ago, has all but eliminated motor noise at low speeds, making the precise control of stepper motors not only possible, but also affordable for applications in environments that demand absolute silence, e.g. office buildings and residential areas.

Due to the immense popularity of StealthChop technology in 3D print applications, the components have been designed for drop-in compatibility with existing 3D printer electronics. This allows for improved applications without the need for costly redesign.

The TMC2202-WA has a step/direction input for fully autonomous operation, while the easy to use UART interface allows for more tuning and control options. Once the ideal settings are found, these can be stored in OTP memory.

To accelerate the design process, Trinamic offers complete end-to-end evaluation kits. The development boards are open-source hardware and freely available for use as a reference design.

For more information on Trinamic products contact Micromech on 01376 333333 or Email sales@micromech.co.uk
Trinamic - TMC2202
The enhanced QFN package with so called wettable flanks allows for automated optical inspection of the solder joints.

Specifying a Motor for a Hazardous Location? What You Need to Know

Article Posted by Parker’s Electromechanical Team on Wednesday, May 2, 2018, on the Parker Motion & Control Technology Blog

Parker BlogHazardous locations are operating environments in which explosive or ignitable vapors or dust are present, or are likely to become present. It is normal for various processing applications where gas, liquid or dust will be present in enough volume to cause an opportunity for them to ignite and cause a fire and/or explosion. An example would be an automated paint spray booth where the vapors in the air would ignite from a spark, or from a motor’s surface temperature that was too hot. In such environments, special motors are needed to ensure that any internal fault in the motor will not ignite, or be a source of an ignition.

A risk assessment must be taken to classify potentially dangerous locations as hazardous environments. Equipment and materials must also be suited for use in these dangerous areas. Learning the commonly used terms and design criteria used to qualify equipment will simplify your specification process.

This is important to know and understand so that if your processes are defined as creating a hazardous environment, you can take the steps necessary to specify the correct equipment into your facility that will not create the potential for people to be injured or killed; or for damages to occur from using this equipment.

 

What are explosion proof requirements for motors?

Parker BlogExplosion proof requirements for servo motors are dictated in the United States by UL674 and in Europe under the acronym of ATEX. The following provides definition to the terms that are commonly used within each of the directives. Thereafter, information on the design criteria used to qualify equipment for use in these hazardous areas.

UL674

Under UL674 directive, hazardous locations are those areas where fire or explosion hazards may exist due to the presence of substances that are flammable, combustible, or ignitable. These locations break into classes and divisions and further defined by groups and temperature classifications.

 

Class definitions

Class I – created by the presence of flammable gases or vapors in the air, or flammable liquids, in sufficient quantities to be explosive or ignitable. Class I locations are further categorized by Division (Refer to chart 1) and fall into Group A through D. (Refer to chart 2).

Class II – created by the presence of combustible dust, suspended in the air, in sufficient quantities to be explosive or ignitable. Class II locations are further categorized by Division (Refer to chart 1) and fall into Group E through G. (Refer to chart 3).

Class III – areas, where there are easily ignitable fibers or flyings, are present. These include cotton lint, flax, and rayon as examples. The fibers in a Class III area are not likely to be in the air but can collect around machinery or on lighting fixtures. A Class III location can be categorized as Division 1 or 2.

These locations don’t normally require hazardous-location motors. Specifying a hazardous-location motor for Class III locations is a common error.

Parker Blog

Chart 2: Gas, vapor, and liquid groups

Relate to the Minimum Ignition Energy of the flammable substance and the location where it is installed. The lower the ignition energy required to ignite the gas, the more dangerous the environment.

Parker Blog

Chart 3: Dust groups

Parker Blog

Temperature classification – “T-Codes”

The surface temperature or any part of the electrical equipment that may be exposed to the hazardous atmosphere should be tested so that it does not exceed 80% of the auto-ignition temperature of the specific gas, vapor or dust in the area where the equipment is intended to be used.

The temperature classification on the electrical equipment label will be one of the following (in degrees Celsius):

Parker Blog

ATEX

ATEX consists of two European (EU) directives. They are:

  • The ATEX 95 equipment directive 94/9/EC, equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres;
  • The ATEX 137 workplace directive 99/92/EC, minimum requirements for improving the safety and health protection of workers potentially at risk from explosive atmospheres.

ATEX defines the hazards into subgroups which are defined as zones, equipment groups, gas groups, dust groups and temperature classes. The following is a definition of each:

Zones – Broken into gas and dust groups. Zones 0, 1, and 2 relate to gas, and zones 20, 21, and 22 relate to dust.

Zone 0 – a place in which explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapor, or mist is present continuously or for long periods, or frequently.

Zone 1 – a place in which explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapor, or mist is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally.

Zone 2 – a place in which explosive atmosphere consisting of a mixture with air of flammable substances in the form of gas, vapor, or mist is not likely to occur, but if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

Zone 20 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible
dust is present continuously, or for long periods, or frequently.

Zone 21 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible
dust is likely to occur in normal operation occasionally.

Zone 22 – a place in which an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud of combustible dust is not likely to occur in normal operation, but if it does occur, will persist for a short period only.

Equipment Groups – Broken into group I and II and further broken down by category. The category definition is based on equipment design for protection.

Group I – Intended for use in underground mines as well as those parts of surface installations of such mines that are endangered by fire and/or combustible dust.

  • Category M1 – ensures a very high level of protection.
  • Category M2 – ensures a high level of protection.

Group II – Intended for use in surface equipment that is, or can be exposed to hazardous conditions (fire or explosion).

  • Category 1 – ensures a very high level of protection against gas, vapor, mists, and dust that are present continuously, frequently, or for long periods.
  • Category 2 – ensures a high level of protection for use in areas in which explosive atmospheres caused by gas, vapor, mists, and dust are likely to occur.
  • Category 3 – ensures a normal level of protection for use in areas in which explosive atmospheres caused by gas, vapor, mists, and dust are unlikely to occur, or would happen infrequently.

Temperature Classes – relate to a flammable substance and its Auto Ignition Temperature.

Parker Blog

Design characteristics for explosion proof equipment (UL674 and ATEX)

There are various design criteria that the manufacturer can incorporate into their design. What is chosen will dictate the hazardous environment that the equipment can be used in. There are 4 “General Principles” of protection against explosion. They include:

  • Explosion Containment – allows the explosion to occur but confines it to a defined area. A structure cannot fail from the explosion.

Parker Blog

  • Segregation – a method that attempts to separate or isolate the electrical parts from the explosive mixture. Practices include pressurization, encapsulation, oil immersion, and powder filling.
Parker Blog
  • Prevention – a method that limits the energy, both electrical and thermal, to safe levels under both normal and fault conditions. Practices include Increased Safety, Intrinsic Safety, Non-Incendive (simplified) and Special Protection.
  • Increased Safety – must prevent the possibility of having excessive temperature or generations of arcs or sparks inside or outside the apparatus during normal operation. Accomplished by incorporating an elevated safety factor to all components that make up the apparatus (connections, wiring, the degree of protection of enclosure, etc.).
  • Intrinsic – the most representative of the prevention concept and is based on the limitation of the energy stored in an electrical circuit (the circuit is incapable of generating arcs, sparks or combustible thermal effects). Intended for process instrumentation applications where the power required is less than 30 volts and 100 mA.
  • Non-Incendive – similar to Intrinsic where the electrical apparatus is incapable of igniting a surrounding mixture during normal operation. They differ in that the non-incendive is not evaluated for safety under fault conditions, so as a result is not approved for Div. 1 environments.
  • Special Protection – developed to allow certification of equipment that is not developed according to any of the existing protection methods. Can be considered safe for a specific hazardous location but must undergo appropriate tests and/or a detailed analysis of the design.

Safety first

Parker BlogBy helping operations personnel and engineers better understand the many factors that go into hazardous duty motor selection, the risk of explosions in facilities can be substantially reduced. Understanding the commonly used terms and design criteria used to qualify equipment provides facility managers with assurance that their operations are safe and in compliance with applicable regulations.

If you’re uncertain that your servo motor will be safe in the environment in which it must operate, always consult the motor manufacturer for assistance. Never guess when worker safety is at stake.

 


 

Parker Blog

 

Article contributed by Jeff Nazzaro, gearhead and motor product manager, Electromechanical & Drives, North America.

 

 

 

 


 

The TMCM-1260 – also as PANdrive

Whether as a standalone module or PANdrive PD57/60-x-1260, the TMCM-1260 offers an intelligent solution transforming digital information into physical motion.

Trinamic announces the motor mountable module TMCM-1260. Available as a complete PANdrive solution or single module, it allows for precise, reliable positioning with high torque.

Michael Randt, Founder and CEO of Trinamic, explains why they offer both the module and PANdrive: “We see a trend developing where engineers are more and more software-oriented. By offering complete building blocks such as the PD57/60-x-1260 or even the TMCM-1260 module, we provide them with easy to use smart stepper motor drives embodying the latest Trinamic technologies as well as sensorless diagnostics.”

Trinamic TMCM-1260 PANDrive PD57/60-x-1260
Incorporating Trinamic’s popular StealthChop2 technology and CoolStep, the load-dependent current control saving up to 70% energy.  SpreadCycle ensures the highest performance at high speeds, while the magnetic SensOstep encoder provides step-loss detection – even in standstill. Designed for an operating voltage of 12V to 48V DC nominal at up to 6A RMS phase current resulting in 0.55Nm to 3,1Nm pullout-torque, the module provides superior performance wherever small stepper motors are used.

Ensuring precise and rapid positioning, the integrated SixPoint ramp generator per axis offloads the MCU of real-time positioning calculations – even in environments where parameters and target positions must be changed during motion. L R reference switch inputs are incorporated fore very axis as well, and the module comes with StallGuard2 for sensorless homing.

Besides these technologies, Trinamic’s TMCM-1260 allows for host communication via the RS485 or CAN interface using TMCL or the optional CANopen protocol. Together with the free and easy to use TMCL-IDE, the module allows for easy implementation of a standalone program flow and remote-controlled operation.

For more information on the TMCM-1260 or any other Trinamic Products contact Micromech on 01376 333333 or Email sales@micromech.co.uk

Food Grade Gearhead Motor Solves Problem for Packaging Manufacturer

Article Posted by Parker’s Electromechanical Team on Tuesday, June 5, 2018, on the Parker Motion & Control Technology Blog

ParkerGearhead motors can be ideal for the food and packaging industries if they are selected with several key features.

A manufacturer of machines for gluing, fill, sealing and diverting food containers for the food-processing industry had a requirement for the motor and gearhead to be mounted above the food plane. Certain modifications were also needed for the gearhead to make it safe for the food environment, and capable to withstand frequent washdowns.

Gearhead design considerations

The selection criteria to be aware of for selecting products in the food packaging and process industries:

  • Lubrication – must be USDA food grade approved in case of incidental contact with food
  • Sealing – must prevent any leaking as well as prevent any ingress of the fluid during washdown
  • Finish – special FDA-approved finish must be used making it very durable and resistant to chipping, oxidizing or rusting
  • Output Shaft – stainless steel prevents any rust from developing and contaminating the processing food.
ParkerParker solution

Stealth PS planetary gearhead with standard F01 food grade special option Stealth PS planetary gearhead with standard food grade option provides the gearhead with standard modifications including special lubrication, viton seals, special finish and a stainless steel output shaft. Since this food grade modification is a standard option, delivery is only one week over the standard gearhead lead time.

Similar standard modifications exist for:

  • Vacuum
  • Clean room
  • High temperature
  • Radiation

Learn more about Gearheads in this overview video

 


Parker
Article Contributed by Jeff Nazzaro, gearhead and motor product manager, Electromechanical & Drives Division North America

Smart Stepper Motor Drivers Enable Rapid Application Development.

Trinamic - TMCM-1240Stepper motors are always ideal when a lot of torque and precise, reliable positioning is needed at low speeds. Intelligent solutions such as Trinamic’s modules and PANdrive motors with integrated control systems form a simple interface between the digital and the physical world.

The module incorporates Trinamic´s latest stepper motor drive technologies including the popular silent control mode StealthChop in its second generation and the sensorless load-dependent current scaling CoolStep. The magnetic SensOstep encoder provides safe step-loss detection even in stand still.

“15 years ago, we pioneered the market of smart motors with our product line and kept pushing the envelope of integration over the years.”, explains Michael Randt, founder and CEO of Trinamic. “With the latest product releases, we updated smart stepper motor drives to the latest and leading-edge technologies of current control and sensorless diagnostics.”

Trinamic’s TMCM-1240 embeds advanced motor control functions, motion control and PLC features like all other TMCM modules. Host communication is possible using the RS485 or CAN interface or using the optional CANopen protocol. Together with the free and easy to use TMCL-IDE, the module allows for easy implementation of a standalone program flow and remote-controlled operation.

Designed for an operating voltage of 12V to 24V DC nominal at up to 2A RMS phase current resulting in 0.22Nm to 0,7Nm pullout-torque, the new module offers leading-edge current control technologies based on Trinamic’s latest stepper motor driver generation. With Trinamic’s StealthChop™ current control for silent positioning at low speed and SpreadCycle™ for highest performance at high speed, the module provides superior performance wherever small stepper motors are used.

An integrated SixPoint™ ramp generator per axis allows for precise and rapid positioning – even in environments where parameters and target positions must be changed during motion. The module has L R reference switch inputs for every axis and comes with StallGuard2™ for sensorless homing.

For more information on the TMCM-1240 or any other Trinamic Products contact Micromech on 01376 333333 or Email sales@micromech.co.uk

Yaskawa AC Drives now in stock at Micromech.

We are pleased to announce that as well as the Parker AC10 Drives, we now also hold stock of the Yaskawa J1000 Series and V1000 Series AC Drives.

J1000 SeriesJ1000 Series Features:

  • Open loop V/f control
  • RoHS compliance
  • Dual rating: Normal Duty and Heavy Duty
  • Starting torque of 150% at 3 Hz
  • Side-by-side installation due to patented hybrid heatsink
  • Preferred parameter feature
  • “One-touch” copy function with verify with 5-digit LED keypad
  • Increased vibration resistance, from 20 Hz to 50 Hz (0.65G)
  • 1 in 10,000 failure rate
  • Swing PWM function to decrease noise at low carrier frequencies
  • Pre-maintenance function
  • Modbus communication
  • Reduction in mechanical parts to increase MTBF
  • Cooling fan replacement without tools
  • MTBF: 28 years
  • Short Circuit Current Rating (SCCR): 30kA rms symmetrical
  • Built-in dynamic braking transistor

V1000 Series Features:

  • Up to 30% smaller than the competition
  • Current vector control, open loop
  • RoHS compliance
  • On-line tuning
  • SInduction motor (IM) or permanent magnet motor (PM) operation
  • Function Block Diagram (FBD) programming via DriveWorksEZ™
  • Side-by-side installation due to patented hybrid heatsink
  • Removable terminal block with parameter backup function*
  • One-touch” copy function with verify
  • Super-fast 2 ms scan cycle with dual CPU
  • EN954-1 Safety Cat. 3, Stop Cat. 0
  • Increased vibration resistance, from 20 Hz to 50 Hz (0.65G)
  • 1 in 10,000 failure rate
  • Swing PWM function to decrease noise at low carrier frequencies
  • Pre-maintenance function
  • Modbus communication
  • Cooling fan replacement without tools
  • MTBF: 28 years
  • Short Circuit Current Rating (SCCR): 30kA rms symmetrical
  • Common programming with all other Yaskawa drives
  • DriveWizard software available at no extra cost

Please visit our AC drive shop to purchase these inverter drives online. Many drives are in stock for next day delivery (order before 12pm).

For assistance specifying the optimum drive for your application or to check delivery of out stock products contact Micromech on 01376 333333 or Email sales@micromech.co.uk